How much damage do lasers cause to the eyes? What should workers in the laser technology industry do to protect lasers and mitigate damage? How do I choose laser glasses?

  • Categories:Laser Support
  • Author:HUYUN Optoelectronic Equipment Co., Ltd.
  • Time of issue:2023-10-16
  • Readers:621

Laser technology is an important technology widely used in the field of high science and technology. It has now penetrated a number of fields and industries and is widely used in various fast-growing industries. However, the safety issues associated with the use of lasers are often overlooked. Laser radiation has an impact on the health of the human eye, and it is undeniable that with the daily use of laser technology, it can cause extremely serious and irreversible damage to the human eye.

Laser technology is an important technology widely used in the field of high science and technology. It has now penetrated a number of fields and industries and is widely used in various fast-growing industries. However, the safety issues associated with the use of lasers are often overlooked. Laser radiation has an impact on the health of the human eye, and it is undeniable that with the daily use of laser technology, it can cause extremely serious and irreversible damage to the human eye.

That&qu39;s why many laser technology professionals have three questions they want to know about laser injuries: how much damage do lasers cause to the eyes? What should workers in the laser technology industry do to protect lasers and mitigate damage? How do I choose laser glasses?

1. How dangerous are lasers to the eyes?

A number of laser-related safety incidents have occurred in recent years. For example, an elementary school student&qu39;s eyes glowed incessantly after staring at a laser pointer for a few seconds; there have been many similar cases in which lasers have been accidentally thrown into crowds, resulting in retinal damage and permanent blindness. Laser is a high-energy, concentrated wave of light, and the eye is the most light-sensitive organ in the human body. The lens of the eye performs the task of focusing. Generally, ordinary light is harmless to the human eye, but light with a wavelength of about 1400 nm can enter the eye directly and damage the retina and optic nerve.

The parallel visible laser light is focused on a very small spot on the yellow surface of the eye. As a result, the intensity of the laser light in the macular region of the eye can be increased by a factor of up to 100,000 compared to the original laser light. A large amount of light energy enters the retina in a short period of time. The energy consumption of the photochemical reaction is very limited, the rest of the energy is absorbed by the retinal melanin particles and converted into heat, a small portion of which is contained in the vicinity of the retina. Blood flow in the choroid stops and the rest goes to the photoreceptor cell layer of the retina, resulting in a rapid increase in the temperature of the macular photoreceptor cell layer. When the temperature exceeds a certain upper limit, the photoreceptor cells are inactivated by coagulation and denaturation, and photoreceptor cell function is lost. Protein coagulation or denaturation caused by overheating is largely irreversible and can lead to permanent blindness.

Invisible light at wavelengths other than near-infrared can damage the outside of the eye, far-infrared can damage the outer surface of the eye or the cornea, and mid-infrared can penetrate the surface of the eye and cause cataracts; ultraviolet light damages the cornea and lens of the human body. Laser technology produces visible (400-700 nm) and near-infrared (700-1400 nm) light that can pass through the pupil and focus on the retina, causing permanent damage to the retina, the optic nerve and the eye. At high laser powers, the retina vaporizes rapidly, expanding rapidly enough to cause an "eyeball burst" that destroys the entire eyeball. Laser damage to the human eye is positively correlated with the wavelength of the laser and the power delivered. Therefore, laser damage to the human eye is very terrible.

2. How should laser technicians protect lasers and limit damage?

The importance, necessity and effectiveness of laser protection has increased with the development of laser technology and the growing need for laser protection. The most effective protection available on the market today is a variety of laser goggles. As laser technology becomes more prevalent in both military and civilian applications, the variety of laser protective eyewear is increasing. Depending on the application and specific safety requirements, companies usually introduce different available models.

Laser goggles can effectively prevent or reduce laser damage to human eyes. It is an effective and safe way of eye protection. It is suitable for many types of lasers and laser pointers. This optical safety eyewear set is comfortable, attractive, safe and reliable to use. For example, the laser screen technology laser goggles can fully comply with international optical safety standards. It can fully protect a certain area from lasers and bright lights and is suitable for all kinds of laser devices.

3. How to choose laser glasses?

There are many types of laser goggles, using different materials, different principles and different applications.

Therefore, in order to provide effective laser protection, laser goggles should be chosen wisely according to the specific requirements of use. When selecting goggles, first determine the maximum laser power or maximum output power based on parameters such as the maximum laser output power (or energy) to be used, the beam diameter, the pulse width, and so on. Determine the minimum optical density required for the eyewear based on the maximum allowable radiation dose at the relevant wavelength (eye fatigue limit) and the exposure time, and select the appropriate safety glasses accordingly. With regard to the reliability of laser protective eyewear, the results of research on laser protective eyewear for home use are now at the forefront of the world.

Laser generation is based on the principle that light from an optical amplifier material is amplified by the vibrations of an optical resonator, producing light with very constant phase, frequency and direction of propagation. In a comb-type side-emitting semiconductor laser, the optical cavity can contain light in all three spatial dimensions. The direction is achieved primarily by using the equivalent refractive index difference created by the shape of the ribs, while the vertical optical confinement is achieved by using the refractive index difference between different materials. For example, the gain region of an infrared laser with a wavelength of 808 nm is a quantum source of GaAs, and the optical confinement layer consists of AlGaAs with a low refractive index. Since the lattice constants of GaAs and AlGaAs materials are almost the same, it is not possible to obtain such a structure. Simultaneous optical confinement. There may be material quality issues due to network incompatibility.